Never good enough: health care workers and the false promise of job training

July 31, 2009

From the publishers:

In Never Good Enough, Ariel Ducey describes some of the most heavily funded training programs, arguing that both the content of many training and education programs and the sheer commitment of time they require pressure individual health care workers to compensate for the irrationalities of America’s health care system, for the fact that caring labor is devalued, and for the inequities of an economy driven by the relentless creation of underpaid service jobs. In so doing, the book also analyzes the roles that unions–particularly SEIU 1199 in New York–and the city’s academic institutions have played in this problematic phenomenon.

In her thoughtful and provocative critique of job training in the health care sector, Ariel Ducey explores the history and the extent of job training initiatives for health care workers and lays out the political and economic significance of these programs beyond the obvious goal of career advancement. Questioning whether job training improves either the lives of workers or the quality of health care, she explains why such training persists, focusing in particular on the wide scope of its “emotional” benefits. The book is based on Ducey’s three years as an ethnographer in several hospitals and in-depth interviews with key players in health care training. It argues that training and education cannot be a panacea for restructuring—whether in the health care sector or the economy as a whole.

Never good enough : health care workers and the false promise of job training / Ariel Ducey.  Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2009. xi, 300 p.   ISBN 978-0-8014-7504-7

For more information on the availability of this title from the University of Toronto Libraries catalogue, click here.


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